Book Review

Fredrick Backman’s A MAN CALLED OVE

A review of Fredrick Backman’s book, A Man Called Ove. Originally published July 15, 2014 (English version).

A grumpy yet loveable man finds his solitary world turned on its head when a boisterous young family moves in next door.

Meet Ove. He’s a curmudgeon, the kind of man who points at people he dislikes as if they were burglars caught outside his bedroom window. He has staunch principles, strict routines, and a short fuse. People call him the bitter neighbor from hell, but must Ove be bitter just because he doesn’t walk around with a smile plastered to his face all the time?

Behind the cranky exterior there is a story and a sadness. So when one November morning a chatty young couple with two chatty young daughters move in next door and accidentally flatten Ove’s mailbox, it is the lead-in to a comical and heartwarming tale of unkempt cats, unexpected friendship, and the ancient art of backing up a U-Haul. All of which will change one cranky old man and a local residents’ association to their very foundations.

Book Review

Tom Merritt’s PILOT X

Review of Tom Merritt’s upcoming book, Pilot X, which is set to be published on March 14, 2017.

What would happen if a time traveler lived in a world where time could not easily be changed and if it was changed, it might destroy everything but himself?

Pilot X just wants to fly a time ship. Specifically the Verity. But the Guardians of Alenda, rulers of his people, throw him in the middle of a time war. When he makes peace they don’t seem pleased. In fact, his own people treat him like the enemy.

Book Review

Claire Fuller’s SWIMMING LESSONS

Review of Claire Fuller’s newest novel, Swimming Lessons, published February 7, 2017.

Synopsis from Goodreads:

Ingrid Coleman writes letters to her husband, Gil, about the truth of their marriage, but instead of giving them to him, she hides them in the thousands of books he has collected over the years. When Ingrid has written her final letter she disappears from a Dorset beach, leaving behind her beautiful but dilapidated house by the sea, her husband, and her two daughters, Flora and Nan.

Twelve years later, Gil thinks he sees Ingrid from a bookshop window, but he’s getting older and this unlikely sighting is chalked up to senility. Flora, who has never believed her mother drowned, returns home to care for her father and to try to finally discover what happened to Ingrid. But what Flora doesn’t realize is that the answers to her questions are hidden in the books that surround her. Scandalous and whip-smart, Swimming Lessons holds the Coleman family up to the light, exposing the mysterious truths of a passionate and troubled marriage.

Book Review

Paulo Coelho’s THE SPY

Review of Paulo Coelho’s The Spy, which was first published on November 22, 2016. Paulo Coelho is a Brazilian author of The Alchemist, which has been translated into 81 languages. This is his most recent novel.

Synopsis from Goodreads:

In his new novel, Paulo Coelho, best-selling author of The Alchemist and Adultery, brings to life one of history’s most enigmatic women: Mata Hari.

HER ONLY CRIME WAS TO BE AN INDEPENDENT WOMAN

When Mata Hari arrived in Paris she was penniless. Within months she was the most celebrated woman in the city.

As a dancer, she shocked and delighted audiences; as a courtesan, she bewitched the era’s richest and most powerful men.

But as paranoia consumed a country at war, Mata Hari’s lifestyle brought her under suspicion. In 1917, she was arrested in her hotel room on the Champs Elysees, and accused of espionage.

Told in Mata Hari’s voice through her final letter, The Spy is the unforgettable story of a woman who dared to defy convention and who paid the ultimate price.

Book Review

Deborah Willis’ THE DARK AND OTHER LOVE STORIES

This is a collection of short stories by Deborah Willis entitled The Dark and Other Love Stories, which will be published on March 7, 2017.

Synopsis from Goodreads:

The characters in the thirteen stories that comprise The Dark and Other Love Stories exist on the edge of danger, where landscapes melt into dreamscapes and every house is haunted. A drug dealer’s girlfriend signs up for the first manned mission to Mars. A girl falls in love with a man who wants to turn her into a bird. A teenage girl and her best friend test their relationship by breaking into suburban houses. A wife finds a gaping hole in the floor of the home she shares with her husband, a hole that only she can see.

Full of longing and strange humor, these subtle, complex stories about the love between a man and his pet crow, an alcoholic and his AA sponsor, a mute migrant and a newspaper reporter—show how love ties us to each other and to the world.

Book Review · Politics

Surviving a Trump Presidency: Two “Guides” from Opposite Sides of the Spectrum

With the election of Donald J. Trump as the 45th President of the United States, I figured it was time for me to get informed and arm myself with knowledge of today’s political landscape.

This post is a review of two books: Gene Stone’s “The Trump Survival Guide” (released January 10, 2017) and Todd Starnes’ “The Deplorables’ Guide” (released February 7, 2017).